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Creativity, Failure and Learning
Thursday, 19 October 2017 17:54

21st Century Skills include three areas of creativity:
•    Think creatively.
•    Work creatively with others.
•    Implement innovations.

 

The elements for these skills include:

View failure as an opportunity to learn; understand that creativity and innovation is a long-term, cyclical process of small successes and frequent mistakes.

Traditional school doesn't allow for people to take risks and fail. Glenn Wiebe wrote in Are You an Under-taker or a Risk-Taker?

“One of the reasons that we as teachers don’t take risks is our fear of failure. We’re afraid that our state tests scores won’t be good enough or that we’ll look silly in front of kids or that the technology won’t work or that we’ll get calls from parents.

But we also know that failure is often a prerequisite to success. Risk-taking involves possible failure. If it didn’t, it would be called Sure Thing-taking.”

Nothing in life is a sure thing-taking. That is except the answers on a standardized test. Life is not a standardized test or we would have everything labelled A, B, C, or D. Today is so different than yesterday. Look at the economy. Who knows what's going to happen with the stock market? Look at jobs and unemployment. What type of jobs will be available for us in the future? Many jobs we used to offer are no longer an option.

For hundreds of years, people were preparing for factory jobs. That's why schools were set up in that model. They needed to know how to follow orders and not question. Failure was not an option. Candidates for most jobs now need critical thinking skills and to stand out of the crowd. They need to be remarkable. The only way you can be different is to take risks, fail, and come up with new ideas. You also need to build up a network of people you can ask because the world is changing so fast. You won't find the answer in a book. You may not even find the answer online. You will need to know how to collaborate and work together as a team. Each of the team members will bounce ideas off of the other members of the team; some ideas work, some don't. You learn from things that don't work.

“I have not failed. I've just found 10,000 ways that won't work.” ― Thomas A. Edison

We want our kids to be inventors, thinkers, team players, and innovators. The only way to do that is to create a learning environment that encourages failure or new ways that won't work. I believe the secret to success is failure. We need to create an environment that challenges students so they struggle with unfamiliar or difficult information. Why make it easy for someone to learn? Why is it that teachers are working harder now than ever? The students need to be the hardest working people in the room and challenged so they are excited about the topic.

When you look at children playing a game that challenges them in a good way, they are motivated. They don't win right away. They get feedback right away. What is the fun in winning right away or all the time. The fun is in challenging themselves beyond what they know. I know myself and how I am writing and taking risks to write down new thoughts. I learn from you. I learn from others. I don't have to have the right answers all the time. That's what learning is all about. Challenging yourself to change; trying new things and failing and trying again.

Reference:November 15, 2011 Posted by Barbara Bray in 21st Century Skills, Change, Educational Models, Learning Environments, Technology